Sweet! A guide to sugar in your shop

HOT on the heels of the sugar-tax debate comes the first easy-to-use guide to the sugar content of more than 7,000 everyday foods, from sauces, biscuits and ready-meals to fruit and vegetables.

The Sugar Snub Food Guide features a range of foods, sourced from the five major supermarkets, divided by type and then in order of sugar content from lowest to highest.

It uses a traffic-light system to help identify which products are low, medium and high in sugar. Also detailed are fat, saturated fat, salt and calories.

Author Claire White, a mother of one and former breast-cancer patient who decided to go sugar-free after her treatment - and found it highly challenging - says: ‘The book visually demonstrates how much sugar is in everyday favourites, some of which may come as a surprise.

‘Savoury’ foods contain an incredible amount. For example, chilli relish has 67 per cent and sandwich pickle 29 per cent. We are being tricked to eat sweet.

In July the Government advised Britons to reduce their sugar intake to no more than five per cent of daily calories - almost a third of the average consumption - making this book essential reading.

£10.99, from sugarsnub.co.uk

Kindle and iBooks editions, £3.99.

Children eat own weight in sugar
as UK obesity toll swells

MANY children are eating their weight in sugar every year in Britains obesity crisis,  shock figures reveal.

The epidemic means millions will  be  plagued  by  lifelong illnesses, tooth decay and suffer years of bullying.

The statistics, released today, suggest four- to 10-year-olds are taking in the equivalent of 5,500 sugar cubes annually - or about 48lb - the average Weight of a five-year-old child.

The disturbing picture of a sugar-obsessed nation comes as public health chiefs battle to halt an alarming rise in childhood obesity with a sugar-awareness campaign for parents.

Official data shows a Fifth of four and Iive-year-olds and a third of 10- and 11-year-old children are fat, while almost half aged eight have rotten teeth.

It has put them at risk of potentially fatal conditions such as heart disease, cancer and Type 2 diabetes in later life and created a time bomb for the NHS.

Tam  Fry  of  the  National Obesity  Fonun,  said: 'These statistics are appalling. Everybody needs a bit of sugar but the way in which it is being labelled into our food, in the words of the World Health Organisation, is toxic.

Obesity and the diseases it triggers may Well bring down the NHS because of the exorbitant costs of treating them.

We should be addressing ways in  which  We   can  wean  our children off sugar but that requires serious action.'

Guidelines suggest children up to six years old should have no more than half an ounce of sugar daily - or five cubes. Although some parents ration chocolate, sweets and fizzy drinks experts claim so-called healthier alternatives are no better.

Breakfast cereals, yogurts and orange juice are crammed with  sugars. A standard sliced white loaf contains eight teaspoons - as much as a Mars bar.

Campaigner and mother- of-one Claire White, 40, went on to a sugar-free  diet  after  being diagnosed With breast cancel: Now in remission, she has written the Sugar Snub Food Guide, which charts how much is contained in supermarket staples.

She said: 'Parents often discourage or minimise obvious sugars such as fizzy drinks but serve up granola for breakfast with a glass of orange juice, which in one meal tips them over the quota.' The disturbing amount of

sugar consumed by children ; revealed in data compiled by the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition.

It comes as a new campaign is today launched by Public Health England. Change4Life Sugar Smart warns parents of the dangers of too much sugar.

The initiative includes a mobile phone app they can use to check how much sugar is contained in supermarket food and drink. The total sugar in each product is shown in cubes as wall as grams.

The app reveals that the type cal chocolate bar  contains  six cubes of sugar, a small carton of juice over five, and a can of fizzy cola at least nine.

Britain now has 2.5 million Type 2 diabetes sufferers, 90 per cent of whom are overweight or obese.

The scourge is set to cost the UK £50billion a year by 2050.

Dr Alison Tedstone , chiefnutri tionist at Public Health England, said: 'Children are having too much sugar three times the maximum recommended amount.
This can lead to painful tooth decay, weight gain and obesity, which can also affect chi1drens wellbeing as they are more likely to be bullied, have low self-esteem and miss school.

Snubbing sugar is a sweet idea

Knowing that l'm on the too-much-added-sugar-in-food warpath, Mirror reader Claire White very kindly sent me a copy of her brilliant sugar guide.

The book, Sugar Snub Food Guide, was painstakingly researched by Claire after she cut sugar out of her diet following a breast cancer diagnosis.

lt outlines the reasons why too much sugar is bad for us and features an exhaustive list of popular supermarket foods and the amount of sugar they contain. lt’s been my bedtime reading for the past week!

My husband is not impressed. If you'd like to similarly annoy your old man the book's available at:

www.sugarsnub.co.uk

and from Amazon.

The cereal offenders

BREAKFAST cereals with the highest sugar content have been named and shamed as part of a campaign to encourage parents to buy healthy food for their children. Nutrition adviser Claire White has identified the worst-offending cereals in her Sugar Snub Food Guide.

The book, Sugar Snub Food Guide, was painstakingly researched by Claire after she cut sugar out of her diet following a breast cancer diagnosis.

lt outlines the reasons why too much sugar is bad for us and features an exhaustive list of popular supermarket foods and the amount of sugar they contain. lt’s been my bedtime reading for the past week!

My husband is not impressed. If you'd like to similarly annoy your old man the book's available at:

www.sugarsnub.co.uk

and from Amazon.

Beat sugar craving

A sweet tooth is all part of the modern festive season, but a new guide could help you to avoid some of the worst sugar overloads.

Claire White, founder of Sugar Snub – a company dedicated to helping people reduce or eliminate sugar in their diet – has launched The Sugar Snub Food Guide. Listing 7000 everyday products by sugar content, it includes simple steps to reduce sugar consumption and help you shop smart.

Available from Amazon, the ebook costs £3.99, paperback £10.99. Sugar Snub also runs courses and workshops.

www.sugarsnub.co.uk

and from Amazon and iBooks.

Not so sweet

Everyone knows that feeling of the mid-afternoon slump. You are hungry and want something that will instantly satisfy that need. Your choices – a low fat yoghurt or an all-butter croissant.

Instinct tells you that the low fat yoghurt is the best ‘healthy’ option.

However when it comes to the sugar content you couldn’t be more wrong.

The recommended amount of sugar you should have daily in your diet is less than 5g per 100g, with a low fat yoghurt containing about 14g per 100g.

Meanwhile the croissant can have as little as 5.8g per 100g making this, surprisingly, the better option.

“People will cut out things like chocolate and having sugar in tea,”begins Claire White, Sugar Snub founder,“but it is the hidden sugars in things like low fat items which can be high in sugar that add to your daily intake without you knowing.”

Having previously worked as a personal trainer and nutritionist the inspiration for the book –The Sugar Snub Food Guide –came after Claire endured months of gruelling treatment for breast cancer,aged 38.

“When you have cancer you feel as if you have been let down by your body,”the Fontwell resident explains. “I was fit and healthy, didn’t smoke, didn’t drink much and ate well.

“After the chemo I wanted to take back some control, I looked at my diet and went to nutritional therapist Carol Granger who is based in Midhurst.”

With the worry that the cancer could come back, Claire found cancer cells thrive on sugar and so made the decision to cut it out of her diet.

“I was surprised at my reaction over the first couple of weeks. I was really angry and hungry but it was the withdrawal,”she reveals.

“I didn’t realise how much sugar I had, but it took four to six weeks for me to feel the real benefits.

“Also I came to realise when I was actually hungry or if it was because of the sugar.”

Although her diet doesn’t include it, Claire is keen to highlight she doesn’t tell people to cut sugar out completely.

 

“I think if you have a lot cut it out for a small period of time to get it out your system and then reintroduce it back into your diet,” she explains. “It is about making small sensible changes.

“People don’t realise how much sugar there is in things like salad cream or soy sauce so if you cut back or switch to those with less sugar it makes the difference.”

“I see so many people won’t have cake but will have muesli which, because of the dried fruit, can be just as sugary as Coco Pops,” reveals Claire.

“Researching the book has been such an eye opener, it is scary to realise how much sugar is in so many items.”

But hidden sugars isn’t the only issue people have to overcome.

“We have a very emotional relationship with sugar,” says Claire.“To show love we give flowers and chocolates, when we are feeling down we have cakes or biscuits.

“There is a reward aspect associated with it also, and we need to break that habit to change the relationship we have with sugar.”

The book contains 7,000 every day products listed by sugar content, and what initially started as a resource for herself and friends has grown.

“It comes from a genuine place to help people,” she reveals. “I said to my husband when I first came up with the idea ‘if nothing comes of it and I have just shown a few friends how it can impact on their lives then it would have been worth it’.

“There are many sugar free and reduced sugar recipes books but there was a lack of practical advice for supermarket shopping.

“It is the book I wish was available when I gave up sugar.”

Alongside the book Claire also offers two hour workshops, and is keen to go into local businesses and talk to employees or to parents at schools for free about how to cut down sugar.

Through the book Claire shows you can enjoy a way of eating with little or no sugar, which means you can have your cake and eat it too.

10 Reasons sugar is bad for our bodies

Excess sugar damaging our health is becoming harder to ignore. Davina McCall has written a sugar free recipe book, and Jamie Oliver has launched an attack on the fizzy drinks industry.

Personally, I became sugar free following treatment for breast cancer.  At the age of 38, I was, and still am, trying to heal my body, and there are strong links between sugar and cancer. I’m now a huge advocate of sugar reduction, and have written a book, Sugar Snub Food Guide, which lists over 7000 supermarket foods in order of sugar using the traffic light system.  I want to help others shop and cook sugar smart.

We need sugar in our diet to function, but what happens to our bodies when we consume too much?

1 It’s addictive

Sugar and junk foods can cause massive releases of dopamine in the reward part of the brain. This, for many people, can become strongly addictive. Are you a sugar junkie?

2 It makes us FAT

When our stores of glucose in our muscles and liver are full, any extra sugar, particularly fructose, is converted to fat.  We can deal with fructose in fruits for example (don’t stop eating fruit!), but food manufacturers have created Fructose Glucose Syrup and filled fizzy drinks, junk food, and many supermarket foods with it.

3 Linked to Type 2 Diabetes

Insulin is a hormone released from the pancreas when we eat sugar.  If we consistently have too much sugar in our blood, the pancreas can’t keep up with demands, insulin stops working effectively, blood sugar levels skyrocket, and this is a leading driver to Diabetes. Experts forecast that unless we change our diet habits, 70% of the population will have this illness by 2026!

4 Cancer

Elevated insulin levels and metabolic problems associated with excess sugar can cause inflammation in your body. Both are potential drivers for cancer.

5 Uncontrolled Appetite

We have evolved without an off switch for fructose. Your brain will not tell you you’ve had enough fizzy drink, or biscuits.  It can’t, only will-power and cutting back on sugar can.

6 Fatigue

It takes just 30 minutes to go from a chocolate bar sugar high to a sugar crash.

7 Depression

We know sugar causes inflammation, this can spread to the brain and cause depression. Some psychiatrists are now treating depression with diabetic drugs!

8 Raises cholesterol & risk of heart disease

For years saturated fat has been blamed, but sugar is now thought to be a major contributor.  Studies show large amounts of fructose can raise the bad LDL cholesterol.

A 2013 study provided evidence that it could also affect the pumping mechanism of your heart.

9 Alzheimer’s

Potentially soon to be called Type 3 Diabetes. Links are being discovered between insulin resistance and Alzheimer’s.

10 Premature ageing

Overeating sugar damages collagen leading to dull and wrinkled skin.

Learn how to shop and eat sugar smart with the Sugar Snub Food Guide.  Available as an eBook from Amazon, and paperback from November at www.sugarsnub.co.uk, and Amazon.

Time to re-evaluate everything
you’re eating… it could be killing you.

Unless you’ve been living on Mars, you’ll know that sugar has been in the news recently. And with good reason… the general consensus is that it’s not great.

Thankfully, Claire White, author of the SugarSnub food plan, has analysed every item of food sold in the five major supermarkets to identify the best and worst foods in terms of their sugar content, so you don’t have to.

“Sugar has been taking over our diets without us realising how much we are consuming,” explains Claire, who is on a mission to help people eat better since surviving cancer only last year. “Food experts agree that the amount of sugar in the British diet is too high, but sugar seems to be added to so many foods that are readily available on supermarket

shelves. The World Health Organization and the UK government’s advisory body on nutrition, SACN, is strongly advising we cut our added sugar intake to no more than 5% of our daily calories. However, the reality is that you and your family are the only ones who can control the amount of sugar you eat.

“In a daily intake of 2,000 calories, no more than 100 calories should be from added sugar. That’s about 6-7 tsp, or 25g (1tsp=4g). In the UK we currently eat much more than that, which is contributing to many health problems.

“This is why I created SugarSnub™. My advice, and my Traffic Light Guide (green for best foods, red for worst), will help you enjoy a reduced sugar lifestyle. Foods from five large supermarkets have been categorised, and using the Food Standards Agency’s recognised system, arranged in order of sugar quantities.”

Sweet! A guide to
sugar in your shop

HOT on the heels of the sugar-tax

debate, the first easy to use guide to the sugar content of more

than 7,000 everyday foods...
MORE>

Children eat own body weight in sugar

MANY children are eating their

weight in sugar every year in

Britains obesity crisis....MORE>

Beat sugar craving

A sweet tooth is all  part of the modern festive season, but a new guide could help you to avoid some of the worst sugar....MORE>

Not so sweet

Everyone knows that feeling of the mid-afternoon slump. You are hungry and want something that....MORE>

Fiona Phillips

Snubbing sugar
is a sweet idea

Knowing that l'm on the too much
added sugar in food...MORE>

The cereal offenders

BREAKFAST cereals with the highest sugar content have
been named and shamed as
part of a campaign....MORE>

10 Reasons sugar is bad

Excess sugar damaging our health is becoming harder to ignore.....MORE>

Time to re-evaluate

Unless you’ve been living on Mars, you’ll know that sugar has been in the news recently. And with good reason....MORE>